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Electromagnetic Radiation From Cellphones And WI-FI Is Harmful To Insects

Technology is quite literally destroying nature, with a yet another report further confirming that electromagnetic radiation from power lines and cell towers can disorientate birds and insects and destroy plant health. The paper warns that as nations switch to 5G, this threat could increase.

In the analysis, EKLIPSE, an EU-funded review body dedicated to policy that may impact biodiversity and the ecosystem, looked over 97 studies on how electromagnetic radiation may affect the environment. It concluded this radiation could indeed pose a potential risk to bird and insect orientation and plant health, The Telegraph reported.

This is not a new finding, as studies dating back for years have come to the same conclusion. In fact, one study from 2010 even suggested that this electromagnetic radiation may be playing a role in the decline of certain animal and insect populations.

However the charity Buglife warned that despite good evidence of the harms there was little research ongoing to assess the impact, or apply pollution limits.

The charity said ‘serious impacts on the environment could not be ruled out’ and called for 5G transmitters to be placed away from street lights, which attract insects, or areas where they could harm wildlife.

Studies also show electromagnetic radiation could be seriously affecting human health.

The total number of insects has decreased by 76% in the last 37 years

Insects, which comprise two thirds of all species on Earth, have been dying off at alarming rates — with disastrous impacts on food chains and habitats.

This warning comes from German entomology enthusiasts, or bug catchers, who have collected 80 million insects in the Rhine countryside over the last 37 years.

‘It is our greatest fear that a point of no return will be reached, which will lead to a permanent loss of diversity.’

To demonstrate the rapid decline, a lab technician held up two bottles: one from 1994 contains 1,400 grammes of trapped insects, the newest one just 300 grammes.

We only became aware of the seriousness of this decline in 2011, and every year since then we have seen it get worse,’ says Dr Sorg.

Although the exact roots of the die-off is not yet clear, ‘the cause is anthropogenic, there’s no doubt about it,’ he said.

In February, they published the first synthesis of 73 studies on entomological fauna around the world over the past 40 years, covering places from Costa Rica to southern France.

They calculated that over 40 per cent of insect species are threatened with extinction and each year another one per cent is added to this list.

Although pesticides and modern farming play a huge role, electromagnetic radiation could also be a factor.

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